Poll: Just 25 percent of women believe the allegations against Brett Kavanaugh are ‘credible’

September 23, 2018

Poll: Just 25 percent of women believe the allegations against Brett Kavanaugh are ‘credible’ Image Source: Screenshot

Earlier this month, California professor Christine Blasey Ford went public with allegations that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her more than three decades ago when they were in high school. But the results of one recent poll show that not everyone is convinced Ford is telling the truth.

According to a poll released by the Huffington Post, only 25 percent of women believe that Ford’s allegations against Kavanaugh are “credible.” 

Slightly more men, at 28 percent, said they believe Ford’s allegations are “credible.”

Surprise findings?

The HuffPost/YouGov poll was conducted on Sept. 17 and 18 and polled a sample of 1,000 adults living in the United States. Among the 15 questions asked: “Do you think that the allegation of sexual assault against Brett Kavanaugh generally is or is not credible?”

An average of 26 percent of total poll respondents sided with the clinical psychology professor, responding that they felt the accusations were “credible.” Twenty-eight percent of respondents said they felt the accusations were “not credible,” with 34 percent of men and 23 percent of women responding negatively.

A slight majority, at 32 percent overall, responded, “I haven’t heard enough to say,” on the question. Fourteen percent said they were “not sure.”

Younger people responded less often that they felt the accusations were “not credible.” While a whopping 51 percent of those over the age of 65 said they found the allegations to be “not credible,” just 17 percent of those aged 18-29 and just 18 percent of those aged 30-44 felt similarly.

Thirty-nine percent of respondents felt that “if the allegation of sexual assault against Brett Kavanaugh is true,” it “disqualifies him from serving on the Supreme Court,” according to the poll. Twenty percent felt the accusations are “not relevant to [Kavanaugh’s] nomination to the Supreme Court.”

“Absolutely nuts”

The HuffPost/YouGov poll was taken just days after Ford revealed her identity as Kavanaugh’s accuser in an article published by The Washington Post. An anonymous letter outlining the allegations was previously released to the FBI by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), who has been under heavy criticism for waiting until after Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee to make the allegations known to authorities.

The Post story represented the first time the general public learned the details of the allegations. Ford reportedly told the Post that Kavanaugh “groped her over her clothes, grinding his body against hers and clumsily attempting to pull off her one-piece bathing suit and the clothing she wore over it,” claims that Kavanaugh has unconditionally denied.

The circuit court judge has the support of several “witnesses” that Ford says were at the party, including Mark Judge, who has called the allegations “absolutely nuts.” Meanwhile, Ford has yet to testify before the Senate, though some outlets have reported that she and her legal team have made a tentative deal to testify in an “open hearing” on Thursday.

“We’re going to plow right through”

Regardless of their validity, Kanavaugh’s approval has dropped significantly since Ford’s allegations first became public. A recently released Fox poll revealed that only 40 percent of voters would confirm Kavanaugh, while 50 percent would oppose him. Just last month, those numbers were split 45-46.

But this doesn’t seem to be discouraging Senate Republicans, who have continued to back the Supreme Court hopeful. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) boldly stated on Friday that he expects Kavanaugh to still be confirmed.

“In the very near future, Judge Kavanaugh will be on the United States Supreme Court,” McConnell said. “Don’t get rattled by all of this. We’re going to plow right through it and do our job.”


Robert Ayers

Robert Ayers is a writer for Conservative Institute. He has a Bachelor’s degree from Quinnipiac University and a JD from the University of Connecticut.