Juanita Broaddrick blasts Bill Clinton over ‘norms have changed’ remark

June 12, 2018

Juanita Broaddrick blasts Bill Clinton over ‘norms have changed’ remark Anthony Correia / Shutterstock.com

Bill Clinton appears to have contracted a severe case of foot and mouth disease. In its most recent manifestation, the former president suggested that “norms have changed on what you can do to somebody against their will,” and followed that up with “we should all just be focusing on how to do better and how to go forward.”

The backlash to Clinton’s slip was immediate. Among those to criticize the remark was Juanita Broaddrick, who tweeted, “Sooooo….Bill Clinton thinks he should get a pass because it was 1978 when HE RAPED ME….and HE knows it’s not acceptable in today’s society???” 

Clinton slips up . . . again

The former president has made a return to the spotlight in recent weeks to promote a book that he co-authored with novelist James Patterson. To that end, he has been giving interviews … and making life difficult for his press secretary Angel Urena.

Just last week Clinton got “hot under the collar” on NBC when pressed about whether he apologized to Monica Lewinsky, the White House intern with whom he had an affair. That was following another remark in which he stated that former President Barack Obama was given an easy time by the mainstream media because he is “African American.”

The controversial-comment trend continued in a recent PBS interview about former Senator Al Franken (D-MN). Those familiar with these two men know that they have something in common: both have been accused of sexual misconduct by multiple women — Franken lost his position but Clinton did not.

PBS’s Judy Woodruff asked Clinton:  “I assume you think that what happened with you was more serious than what happened with Senator — former Senator Al Franken. He was driven from office, from the U.S. Senate. So, norms have changed. Do you think that’s a good thing?”

“I think the norms have really changed in terms of, what you can do to somebody against their will, how much you can crowd their space, make them miserable at work,” Clinton replied. He continued:

You don’t have to physically assault somebody to make them, you know, uncomfortable at work or at home or in their other — just walking around. That, I think, is good.

Not surprisingly, Clinton was unwilling to condemn Franken, calling his situation “a difficult case, a hard case.”

He appeared to treat Franken as he hopes others would treat him, saying:

There may be things I don’t know. But I — maybe I’m just an old-fashioned person, but it seemed to me that there were 29 women on ‘Saturday Night Live’ that put out a statement for him, and that the first and most fantastic story was called, I believe, into question. Too late to wade into it now.

“I think that all of us should just be focusing on how to do better and how to go forward,” he concluded. Watch the whole clip below:

The Backlash

Unsurprisingly, the remark about the changing “norms” received widespread criticism, including from Juanita Broaddrick, who accuses Clinton of raping her in 1978 when he was running for the governorship of Arkansas. On Monday, she tweeted:

Broaddrick was joined by countless others, including conservative commentator Kayleigh McEnany, who called Clinton “gross” and suggested that he “stop talking.”

But the criticism has not only been from the political right. New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman tweeted:

As did former MSNBC producer Matt Stoller:

Damage control

Clinton’s office has done their best to rationalize the remark. “He was not suggesting that there was ever a time that it was acceptable to do something against someone’s will,” said Urena. “He’s saying that norms have changed in a variety of ways in how we interact with one another, and that’s all for the good.”

But many are not convinced, and even the most loyal supporters are beginning to turn on Bill, which is just another indicator that the Clinton Family Stock appears to be in a state of free fall.


Robert Ayers

Robert Ayers is a writer for Conservative Institute. He has a Bachelor’s degree from Quinnipiac University and a JD from the University of Connecticut.