Juanita Broaddrick, Clinton rape victim, slams Oprah’s Golden Globes speech

January 10, 2018

Juanita Broaddrick, Clinton rape victim, slams Oprah’s Golden Globes speech Sustainable_OS_2012 / CCL; Disney | ABC Television Group / CCL

At least one person wasn’t buying what Oprah Winfrey was selling at the Golden Globes on Sunday.

Retired nurse Juanita Broaddrick, 75, an alleged Bill Clinton rape victim, blasted the billionaire talk show icon for glossing over the former president’s sexual abuses when Winfrey interviewed him years ago.

In contrast, Winfrey spoke as if she were a champion of sexually abused women at the awards ceremony, saying in part:

I want all the girls watching here, now, to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say “Me too” again.

Can you hear me now?

Broaddrick revived the iconic Verizon “Can you hear me now?” advertisements in a tweet directed at Oprah on Monday. She observed that in all of Winfrey’s statements addressing sexual assault, she — a rape victim — was never mentioned.

Broaddrick tweeted:

Juanita Broaddrick on Twitter

Hey @Oprah #Goldenglobes. Funny I’ve never heard you mention my name. CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?Guess not. My rapist was/is your friend, Bill Clinton https://t.co/zBSPnrqRzk

Addressing victims at the Golden Globes, Winfrey stated, “You get a voice. You get a voice. Everybody gets a voice.” But that seems like it doesn’t apply to everyone.

In a 2004 interview with Clinton, Winfrey brought up his White House affair with a young intern, Monica Lewinsky. But she turned it around to make former President Clinton the victim.

“As you know, many people will buy your book to look for your take on Monica Lewinsky and the impeachment trial. What was the most difficult part of that time for you?” Winfrey asked Clinton. That wasn’t lost on Broaddrick, who tweeted on Monday:

Juanita Broaddrick on Twitter

Remember this @Oprah You’ve had so many opportunities to bring up my allegations, which have never been discredited. Why?? https://t.co/C7Iaqn0kOp

Big fat phony

Winfrey’s apparently-inspirational Golden Globes speech prompted cries from the left for her to challenge President Donald Trump’s reelection to the White House in 2020.

Those hopes were dashed on Tuesday, however, when CBS This Morning co-anchor Gayle King announced that although her friend Oprah might be “intrigued” by the notion, she has no intention to run for president at the moment.

That’s probably wise, given recent reports that the famous talk show host was used by Harvey Weinstein to impress his victims.

Additionally, Oprah may not be the morality icon she claims to be. In a New York Post opinion piece, Maureen Callahan described Winfrey as the representation of “fake science, hucksters and greed.” Callahan continued:

Winfrey routinely endorsed fake science and spiritual hucksters. She cast herself as America’s foremost secular deity and seems to still believe it. Logic and reason don’t guide Oprah Winfrey; feelings and money do.

Of course, the same could be said for many in Washington — but given her poor treatment of rape victims like Broaddrick and her endorsement of sexual predators like Weinstein, Oprah would likely have a hard time getting there.


Michael Dorstewitz

Michael Dorstewitz is a writer for the Conservative Institute. He is an attorney and a former U.S. Merchant Marine officer. His writing can also be seen at BizPac Review and NewsMax.