Air Force announces purchase of ‘bunker busters’ to take out North Korean nukes

February 12, 2018

Air Force announces purchase of ‘bunker busters’ to take out North Korean nukes Image Source: Screenshot

As North Korea does its best to show the world its softer side at the 2018 Winter Olympics, Pyongyang is getting some unwelcome news.

The U.S. Air Force has placed an order with Boeing for $21 million worth of GBU-57 Massive Ordnance Penetrators (MOPs), commonly referred to as “bunker busters,” that can be used to take out North Korea’s nuclear facilities, United Press International reported.

The deal with Boeing was announced on Thursday by the Department of Defense (DOD).

“Massive ordnance penetrators”

“The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, has been awarded a $20,970,424 contract for the procurement of GBU-57 massive ordnance penetrators,” the DOD said in the press release.

The department continued:

Work will be performed in St. Louis, Missouri, and is expected to be complete by July 31, 2020. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2016 production funds in the amount of $20,970,424 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, is the contracting activity.

The mega bombs, which were tested by the Air Force in May, will be a key component in any attack on North Korea’s nuclear capabilities.

The test “demonstrated the weapon’s effectiveness,” according to Bloomberg, who interviewed Army Lieutenant Colonel Michelle Baldanza, a spokeswoman for the Pentagon’s combat testing office.

Built to attack

The contract will likely also include production of the most recent version of the MOP, otherwise known as the GBU-57D/B.

“The Air Force has deployed an upgraded version of the U.S.’s largest non-nuclear bomb — a 30,000-pound “bunker-buster” that can only be carried by the B-2 stealth bomber and could be used against adversaries such as North Korea,” Bloomberg reported in January.

The report continued:

Bombs known as bunker-busters have been in the Air Force’s arsenal for years for potential attacks against buried targets. The GBU-57, which is six times bigger than the 5,000-pound bomb the Air Force has had for years, could be used if the U.S. decided to hit underground nuclear or missile facilities in North Korea, as tensions persist over Kim Jong Un’s growing nuclear arsenal.

The MOPs are bigger than the famed “Mother Of All Bombs” that the United States hit Islamic State forces with in Afghanistan last April.

North Korea best be warned.

With Donald Trump in office, the U.S. isn’t messing around.


Carmine Sabia

Carmine Sabia Jr. is a staff writer for Conservative Institute. He specializes in covering political news and current events. He has contributed to BizPac Review and co-hosts Para Bellum Radio Mondays at 5 p.m. on WNJC1360 in Philadelphia.