More black babies are being aborted than born in New York City

November 20, 2018

More black babies are being aborted than born in New York City lev radin / Shutterstock.com

The importance of Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination and a conservative majority on the Supreme Court cannot be overstated, especially with regards to the black community.

Jason L. Riley, a member of the Wall Street Journal Editorial Board, exposed the urgency behind the pro-life movement in a riveting column illustrating how more black babies are murdered by abortion than are born alive in places like New York City every year.

Staggering statistic

Before the Republican-led civil rights movement, many black Americans were strict anti-abortionists and were more likely to oppose the deadly practice than their white counterparts. Despite attempts to characterize him as a pro-choicer, researchers note that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “stridently denounced abortion as a form of genocide in many speeches.”

Dr. King was joined by black civil rights advocates like Fannie Lou Hamer and Whitney Young who deplored the procedure, and even Rev. Jesse Jackson referred to abortion as “murder” when it was fashionable to do so. However, those attitudes began to shift in the following decades, and a 2017 Pew Research Center survey determined that 50 percent of Hispanics, 58 percent of whites and 62 percent of blacks now contend that abortion should be legal in all or most cases.

The consequences of these changing opinions have been devastating. According to statistics from the NYC Health Department released in May, black mothers terminated 136,426 pregnancies and gave birth to 118,127 babies during a four year period ending in 2016.

Disproportionate statistics

Although they make up just 13 percent of the female population in America, black mothers account for a disproportionate 36 percent of total abortions.

Riley disputes the common progressive response to these asymmetrical statistics, arguing that “[r]acism, poverty and lack of access to health care” are not plausible explanations. Instead, he explains that — however uncomfortable it may be to consider — “black self-destructive behavior” and cultural disparities are to blame.

“Unmarried women are more likely to experience an unintended pregnancy, and black women are less likely than their white, Asian and Hispanic counterparts to marry,” Riley wrote. “It’s true that many of these would-be partners are sitting in prison, but it’s also true that this racial divide in marriage, which started in the 1960s and has grown ever since, predates the ‘mass incarceration’ of black men that took off in the 1980s.”

Riley is joined by modern civil rights activists like DePaul University professor of philosophy Jason Hill, who believe that abortion is just another form of self-immolation from the black community. Groups like Black Lives Matter “want white people to esteem black lives and value the humanity of black people when they themselves can’t condemn and express moral outrage at those who maim and kill black children in the course of gang warfare, senseless street violence, and drive-by shootings,” Hill explained.

“When you combine the amount of black violent behavior directed at other blacks with the number of pregnancies terminated by black women,” argued Riley, “the rate at which blacks willingly end the lives of one another is chilling and far surpasses what goes on within other racial and ethnic groups.”

Planned Population

If there are external factors at play to explain the propensity for abortion within the black community, the blame certainly doesn’t rest with pro-life Republicans.

Pro-life activists point straight at Planned Parenthood, the annual sponsor of hundreds of thousands of taxpayer-funded abortions, and its controversial founder, birth control activist and eugenicist Margaret Sanger, who once described unwanted children as “human weeds.”

Unfortunately, the success of Planned Parenthood’s pro-abortion agenda has led some social activists to deplore an abortion-driven black genocide,” and in recent years pro-life African Americans have joined hands with white anti-abortionists to expose this growing pandemic. Some religious black conservatives have even co-opted the slogan “Black Lives Matter” to give it a pro-life connotation, calling for a “Black Babies Matter” movement.

During the Barack Obama presidency, a group calling themselves Live Action published a series of undercover videos in which Planned Parenthood employees appeared to agree to accept donations specifically for performing abortions on black women. In August 2015, two dozen black Christian leaders and social activists protested in front of the National Portrait Gallery, calling for museum officials to remove a bust of Sanger displayed in a “Struggle for Justice” exhibit.

Thanks to a conservative majority on the Supreme Court, help is on the way for all citizens who treasure life and understand the importance of defending the defenseless.

However, like many social issues that have plagued a people throughout their history, true and lasting change can only begin from within. And with a new generation of highly-motivated black conservatives taking the issue of abortion head-on, there’s hope.


Benjamin Baird

Benjamin Baird is a senior staff writer for the Conservative Institute. He is a veteran infantryman of Iraq and Afghanistan with over 1000 days in combat and holds a degree in Middle Eastern studies from the American Military University. Ben is a regular contributor at the Middle East Forum and has written for dozens of conservative publications, including The Daily Caller, American Spectator, American Thinker, New English Review and Yahoo News.